Today’s Headlines: Aircraft Carrier Wasn’t Sailing to Deter North Korea, as U.S. Suggested

Theresa May Calls for New Election in Britain, Seeking Stronger ‘Brexit’ Mandate |
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Aircraft Carrier Wasn’t Sailing to Deter North Korea, as U.S. Suggested

By MARK LANDLER and ERIC SCHMITT

The saga might never have come to light had the Navy not posted a photograph of the Carl Vinson sailing through the Sunda Strait, which separates two Indonesian islands.

Prime Minister Theresa May at 10 Downing Street on Tuesday. In her statement, she said she had

Theresa May Calls for New Election in Britain, Seeking Stronger ‘Brexit’ Mandate

By STEVEN ERLANGER

The prime minister had repeatedly ruled out a snap election but is now betting that her party can increase its majority.

The future of Fox News host Bill O'Reilly rests in the hands of Rupert Murdoch and his sons, Lachlan and James.

Bill O’Reilly’s Future at Fox Grows Dim as the Murdochs’ Support Erodes

By EMILY STEEL, MICHAEL S. SCHMIDT and JIM RUTENBERG

The position of the No. 1 host in cable news grew more tenuous as support from the Murdoch family showed signs of eroding, according to people briefed on discussions about his future.

For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

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Editors’ Picks
A young woman was splashed with water in Sancraieni, Romania, as a part of a regional Easter Monday tradition.

WORLD | Sancraieni Journal

Spring in Transylvania: Wake Up and Splash (or Be Splashed)

By PALKO KARASZ

An Easter Monday rite in some villages has young men reciting poems to women, then dousing them with bucketfuls of water.

OPINION | Op-Ed Contributor

My Daughter Is Not Transgender. She’s a Tomboy.

By LISA SELIN DAVIS

She has short hair and doesn’t like princesses, so adults keep asking if she wants to be a boy. Can’t she just be who she is?

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

“The world ended, and everyone said, ‘Never forget.’ We are essentially making people forget, because we have basically sanitized Battery Park City of every single reminder of the attacks.” AMY McCARTHY KOETHE, a parishioner at St. Joseph’s, a Roman Catholic chapel opposite the World Trade Center site that was used as a command station after the Sept. 11 attacks. The chapel is likely to close this year because of escalating rents.

Today’s Videos

Video Video: Girl Boxer Jesselyn Silva is only 10 years old, but she’s already in the ring.

Sam Wolson for The New York Times. Technology by Samsung.

Video Video: Dinner With a Dung Beetle In this 360° video, get an up-close look at how a dung beetle in Laikipia, Kenya, prepares a meal.

World

Already Unwelcoming, Hungary Now Detains Asylum Seekers

By RICK LYMAN

New laws will keep migrants and refugees in vast camps surrounded by razor wire while their cases are decided. Even then, most will be rejected.

A military parade on Saturday honoring the birthday of the founder of North Korea, Kim Il-sung, in Pyongyang, the capital. A debate has emerged in China over whether the government should abandon its longstanding patronage of the North.

Criticism of Beijing’s North Korea Policy Comes From Unlikely Place: China

By CHRIS BUCKLEY

A rare challenge by a well-known historian shows the renewed debate over China’s longstanding patronage of its unpredictable neighbor.

A rally in Istanbul on Tuesday protesting the expansion of the powers of the Turkish president.

Videos Fuel Charges of Fraud in Erdogan’s Win in Turkey Referendum

By PATRICK KINGSLEY

The Turkish president has turned his claimed victory into political reality, but the vote’s legitimacy is still in doubt as observer groups list many concerns.

For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

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U.S.
Steve W. Stephens was being sought in connection with a fatal shooting in Cleveland on Sunday.

Hunt for Facebook Killer Ends With McDonald’s Sighting and a Suicide

By RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA, CHRISTOPHER MELE and SERGE F. KOVALESKI

Two days after Steve W. Stephens shot a stranger in Cleveland and posted a video of the crime online, he ended his life near Erie, Pa.

The body of a victim on Tuesday in Fresno, Calif. The police said Kori Ali Muhammad fired 16 bullets from a .357-caliber revolver within about a minute.

Gunman, Thought to Be Targeting Whites, Kills 3 in Fresno, Police Say

By MATTHEW HAAG

Kori Ali Muhammad had been on the run since Thursday, when he was suspected of killing a security guard. He surrendered to the police after Tuesday’s rampage.

Scott Braden, an assistant federal defender, hopes to save the five men still facing execution this month.

In Arkansas, a Tempered Victory for Death Penalty Opponents

By ALAN BLINDER and MANNY FERNANDEZ

Lawyers and a small group of allies have had success in their resistance to a plan to execute eight men over less than two weeks, but death penalty opponents face formidable opposition in the state.

For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

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Politics
Ivanka Trump and her husband, Jared Kushner, at a state dinner for President Xi Jinping of China and his wife at the Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach, Fla., this month.

Ivanka Trump’s Global Reach, Undeterred by a White House Job

By DANNY HAKIM and RACHEL ABRAMS

The president’s daughter, now a White House adviser, has filed 173 foreign trademarks in 21 countries, as well as in Hong Kong and the European Union.

President Trump departing Air Force One last week in West Palm Beach, Fla. During the campaign, he vowed to

Policy Advisers Urge Trump to Keep U.S. in Paris Accord

By CORAL DAVENPORT

Support for keeping the United States in the landmark Paris climate deal of 2015 seems to be gaining traction, experts say.

President Trump was joined by members of his cabinet and coal industry workers last month as he signed an executive order rolling back United States climate change policies.

As Trump Drifts Away From Populism, His Supporters Grow Watchful

By PETER BAKER

President Trump has demonstrated that while he won office on a populist message, he has not consistently governed that way in the nearly 100 days in the White House.

For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business

Goldman Sachs Reports Weak First-Quarter Trading

By KATE KELLY

What has been a core strength of the firm showed markedly weaker results in the first three months of the year, while rivals thrived.

Microsoft China Center One in Beijing showcases Microsoft-inspired innovation in China.

As Zeal for China Dims, Global Companies Complain More Boldly

By SUI-LEE WEE

International firms still fear retaliation but are escalating their behind-the-scenes rhetoric as China becomes a more difficult business environment.

Vijay Mallya in 2012. British police arrested him on Tuesday, as part of extradition proceedings that could lead to him being sent back to India, which he fled more than a year ago under an avalanche of unpaid bills and accusations of fraud.

Vijay Mallya, Once India’s ‘King of Good Times,’ Is Arrested in London

By AMIE TSANG and HARI KUMAR

He was held as part of extradition proceedings that could lead to him being sent back to India, which he fled over a year ago under an avalanche of unpaid bills and accusations of fraud.

For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology

Trump Signs Order That Could Lead to Curbs on Foreign Workers

By GLENN THRUSH, NICK WINGFIELD and VINDU GOEL

The president said the executive order was a way to end the “theft of American prosperity,” which he said had been brought on by low-wage immigrant labor.

Mark Zuckerberg at Facebook's annual developer conference in San Jose, Calif., on Tuesday. The company called for computer programmers to build augmented reality-based apps for its platform.

Mark Zuckerberg Sees Augmented Reality Ecosystem in Facebook

By MIKE ISAAC

Facebook’s chief executive introduced an augmented reality platform that will allow people to digitally manipulate the world around them.

Snap's new technology allows users to place 3-D cartoon images into their pictures and videos.

To Stay Ahead of Facebook, Snap Rolls Out 3-D Features for Messaging

By KATIE BENNER

The company’s stock has fallen as competitors copy the features that once made Snapchat unique.

For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports
Los Angeles Rams guard Jamon Brown (68) competed against Tampa Bay Buccaneers defensive end Howard Jones in an arm wrestling event at the MGM Hotel and Casino on the Vegas Strip in April.

As It Embraces Las Vegas, N.F.L. Is Awash in Gambling Contradictions

By KEN BELSON

The decision to move the Raiders to Las Vegas from Oakland presents conflicts for a league that has long opposed gambling.

From left, Madeleine, Pierre, Nadine and Marie Claire Ntonga during their ride home to Manhattan from tennis practice in the Bronx.

Cameroonian Siblings Find a New Interest (Tennis) in a New Land

By DAVID WALDSTEIN

The four Ntongas have shown a remarkable aptitude for tennis after stumbling upon the Leeds Center and New York Junior Tennis and Learning.

Cristiano Ronaldo, center, after scoring the goal that put Real Madrid ahead on aggregate in extra time against Bayern Munich on Tuesday.

On Soccer

Champions League: A Night to Remember, Except for the Referee

By RORY SMITH

Cristiano Ronaldo’s hat trick gave Madrid a 4-2 victory – and a 6-3 win on aggregate – amid several controversial decisions by the referee.

For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts
Andy Karl talks about his injury in a dressing room interview minutes after the opening performance of

Injured but Determined, Andy Karl Opens ‘Groundhog Day’

By MICHAEL PAULSON

Three days after tearing his A.C.L. during a preview performance of the Broadway production, the actor put on a brace and put on a show.

A Word With

Steve Martin on Teaching You (and Himself) How to Be a Comedian

By DAVE ITZKOFF

Mr. Martin takes a rare, retrospective dive into his stand-up career to find lessons for aspiring comics and reflect on what he’s learned.

Actors portray a Berlin stage troupe in a playful moment in Paula Vogel's

‘Indecent’ Pays Heartfelt Tribute to a Stage Scandal

By BEN BRANTLEY

Paula Vogel makes her long-awaited Broadway debut, telling the story of a Yiddish drama shut down in 1923.

For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

New York
Mr. Hernandez during a court appearance in 2012. It took two trials, each of which lasted five months, for prosecutors to persuade a jury to convict him of kidnapping and murder.

Pedro Hernandez Gets 25 Years to Life in Murder of Etan Patz

By JAMES C. McKINLEY Jr.

The sentencing of Mr. Hernandez, who was found guilty of the 1979 kidnapping and murder, brings to a close a case that bedeviled investigators for decades.

The Rev. John Brobbey leading a service this month at St. Joseph's Chapel, in Battery Park City, which is in danger of closing because of a steep rent increase.

Chapel That Survived Sept. 11 Attacks May Not Survive Rent Increase

By SHARON OTTERMAN

A chapel across from the World Trade Center, St. Joseph’s, was a command station for emergency workers. But rising rents may force it to close.

Steven Odiase leaving Bronx Supreme Court on Monday after his murder conviction was vacated.

About New York

The Case of the Missing Murder Witness

By JIM DWYER

When the police knocked on doors after a Bronx killing, one woman identified the gunman. So why did her account never make it to the defense?

For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Food
Kabir Ahmed cooks to order during the early shift in his food cart.

A Day in the Life of a Food Vendor

By TEJAL RAO

The vendors are a fixture of New York streets and appetites, yet they struggle daily with weather, logistics and rules. Here’s the story of one.

The strawberries at Harry's Berries, grown in Oxnard, Calif., are harvested only once every five days, to give the fruit time to reach its peak flavor.

Red, Ripe and Renegade: Berries That Break All the Rules

By KAREN STABINER

They don’t produce a lot or last long. But Harry’s Berries, a 50-year-old family farm in California, thrives by selling strawberries at their peak.

Wine Industry Finds a Companion in a Competitor: Marijuana

By ERIC ASIMOV

Some worried that legalized cannabis would infringe on the wine business, but the two industries have embraced their shared agricultural base.

For more dining news and recipes, go to NYTimes.com/Dining »

Obituaries
Sylvia Moy and Stevie Wonder, with, behind from left, James Jamerson, Earl Van Dyke and Robert White of the Funk Brothers, in 1967.

Sylvia Moy, Songwriter Who Worked With Stevie Wonder, Dies at 78

By RICHARD SANDOMIR

Ms. Moy was a Motown record producer who helped write hits like “My Cherie Amour” and “Uptight (Everything’s Alright).”

Bishop Frederick H. Borsch, right, at an interfaith gathering of religious leaders from Los Angeles and Riverside Counties in Los Angeles in 1998. After he retired in Los Angeles, he became associate dean of the Yale Divinity School.

Frederick Borsch, Bishop Who Worked to Empower Minorities, Dies at 81

By SAM ROBERTS

As leader of the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles from 1988 to 2002, he elevated female and Hispanic clergy. And he championed the ordination of gay men and lesbians.

For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

Editorial

Editorial

Mr. Trump Plays by His Own Rules (or No Rules)

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

The president and his administration are fostering a culture of self-enrichment and self-dealing, ignoring norms of ethical conduct and transparency.

Moon Jae-in, a top contender for president of South Korea, campaigning in Seoul on Monday.

Editorial

South Korea’s Moment of Truth

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

The next president will enter office with Park Geun-hye on trial and Kim Jong-un rattling missiles.

Editorial

Big Tobacco Attacks Sensible F.D.A. Rules on Vaping

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

Regulations could restrict the marketing to young people of nicotine products the industry now sells.

For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Op-Ed
The cast of

Op-Ed Columnist

A Requiem for ‘Girls’

By ROSS DOUTHAT

A last look at the decade’s most important (and occasionally reactionary) show.

President Trump speaking with small business leaders at the White House in January.

Contributing Op-Ed Writers

Why Are Republicans Making Tax Reform So Hard?

By STEVE FORBES, LARRY KUDLOW, ARTHUR B. LAFFER and STEPHEN MOORE

President Trump already has a good tax plan. We helped write it.

Op-Ed | Julia Baird

Is Your Pastor Sexist?

By JULIA BAIRD

The toxic theology of teaching women’s subservience – in church and at home.

For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

ON THIS DAY

On April 19, 1995, a truck bomb exploded outside the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, killing 168 people and injuring 500. (Timothy McVeigh was later convicted of federal murder charges and executed.)

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