Today’s Headlines: Erdogan Claims Vast New Powers After Narrow Victory in Turkish Referendum

A ‘Cuban Missile Crisis in Slow Motion’ in North Korea |
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A supporter of a proposal to expand the power of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan held a picture of the Turkish leader at a rally on Sunday in Istanbul.

Erdogan Claims Vast New Powers After Narrow Victory in Turkish Referendum

By PATRICK KINGSLEY

The main opposition demanded a recount and warned that the vote might cement authoritarian rule within one of the critical power brokers of the Middle East.

North Korea's first submarine-launched ballistic missile, the Pukguksong-1, was among the hardware displayed Saturday in the capital, Pyongyang.

News Analysis

A ‘Cuban Missile Crisis in Slow Motion’ in North Korea

By DAVID E. SANGER and WILLIAM J. BROAD

As the standoff grows under a new American president, a mix of national ambitions, personal ego and deadly weapons is creating opportunities for miscalculation.

Anastasia Economopoulou, 42, pushed back her dream of having several children because she feared losing her job as a saleswoman at a retail branding company.

Fewer Children in Greece May Add to Its Financial Crisis

By LIZ ALDERMAN

Demographers in Europe say lower birthrates in the south will mean weaker growth and productivity, producing fiscal problems.

For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

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Editors’ Picks
Girl Scouts from Troop 6000 on an outing this month. The troop was created in February at a Queens hotel where homeless families have been placed.

N.Y. / REGION

Living by the Girl Scout Law, Even Without a Home

By NIKITA STEWART

Troop 6000 is the first in New York City composed solely of homeless girls. A reflection of the state of homelessness in the city, it is also a source of pride for its members.

OPINION | Op-Ed Contributor

How Democrats Should Spend Their Millions

By STEVE PHILLIPS

In the Georgia special election and beyond, invest heavily in turnout, not TV ads.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

“It’s just about the most right thing I’ve ever been a part of.” Jimmy Van Bramer, a New York City councilman representing part of Queens, on Girl Scout Troop 6000, the city’s first troop designated solely for homeless girls

Today’s Videos

Video Video: First, Do No Harm Practiced from the 1930s to the 1950s, a radical surgery — the lobotomy — forever changed our understanding and treatment of the mentally ill.

World
Women in India's Bihar State marching to the cornfield where they had discovered illegal moonshine.

Alcohol Ban Succeeds as Women Warn, ‘Behave, or We’ll Get Tough’

By GEETA ANAND

The women of Bihar State, one of India’s poorest, have enthusiastically welcomed a strict prohibition law, and often take matters into their own hands.

The Walled Off Hotel, opened by the artist Banksy, stands just across from the Israeli security barrier in the West Bank city of Bethlehem.

Bethlehem Journal

Banksy Hotel in the West Bank: Small, but Plenty of Wall Space

By IAN FISHER

The Walled Off Hotel, opened by the British artist Banksy across an alley from the West Bank wall that separates Israelis from Palestinians, bears witness and whimsy.

Jean-Luc Mélenchon, a candidate for president of France, in Toulouse on Sunday.

Left-Wing Politician Shakes Up France’s Presidential Race

By ADAM NOSSITER

Jean-Luc Mélenchon’s advisers depict him as a kind of French Bernie Sanders, but with no strong party establishment to block his way.

For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

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U.S.
The Colorado River in Yuma, Ariz. Evangelical pastors have begun to preach a gospel of salvation for the 1,450-mile river, which has struggled as a result of development, drought, overuse and a changing climate.

To These Pastors, Saving the Colorado River Is a Divine Command

By FERNANDA SANTOS

Across the West, Hispanic evangelical pastors are invoking environmental activism in their Sunday sermons.

Aya Hijazi and her husband, Mohamed Hassanein, in a holding cell at a courthouse in Cairo, Egypt, in March.

American Aid Worker Is Cleared of Child Abuse Charges in Egypt

By DECLAN WALSH

Aya Hijazi, who founded a nonprofit to care for street children in Cairo, was accused of human trafficking in a case rights groups called “a travesty.”

Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, the national security adviser, left, met on Sunday with Afghan leaders, including the government's chief executive, Abdullah Abdullah.

After U.S. Talks With Afghanistan, Hints at a Harder Line on Pakistan

By MUJIB MASHAL

President Trump’s national security adviser urged Pakistan to crack down on militants as the administration reviews its role in Afghanistan and the Taliban resurgence there.

For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

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Politics
Representative Mike Conaway, Republican of Texas, will oversee the House Intelligence Committee investigation into Russian election meddling.

Mike Conaway Emerges From Relative Obscurity to Lead House Russia Inquiry

By EMMARIE HUETTEMAN

Mr. Conaway, a Texas Republican who is the chairman of the Agriculture Committee, is the accidental heir to a potentially explosive investigation.

Vice President Mike Pence, center, and his wife, Karen Pence, greeted soldiers and their family members on Sunday at an Easter dinner at a military base in Seoul, South Korea.

Pence, in South Korea, Calls North Korea Missile Test ‘a Provocation’

By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS

The vice president is beginning a 10-day tour of Asia and will meet Monday with the acting president of South Korea.

Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla. President Trump has made seven trips there since taking office but has rarely ventured elsewhere.

A Homebody President Sits Out His Honeymoon Period

By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS

Presidents often travel during first months in office and push a policy agenda. But without clear priorities, President Trump has stuck closer to home.

For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business
Ryan Gosling, left, with Thomas E. Rothman, the chairman of Sony Pictures Entertainment, at the CinemaCon convention in March. Mr. Gosling will star in Sony's

Car Chases, Cute Newcomers and Familiar Faces: Plotting a Turnaround at Sony Pictures

By BROOKS BARNES

The studio’s movie chairman, Thomas Rothman, has several promising films scheduled for release, but whether one will be the megahit he needs is uncertain.

A drilling rig on Alaska's North Slope in 2007.

BP Struggles to Control Damaged Well in Alaskan Arctic

By CLIFFORD KRAUSS

Crews have been battling frigid winds to secure the well, which began spewing natural gas vapors on Friday. No injuries were reported.

An advertising campaign by the body care line Éclair Naturals.

On Advertising

Marketing Natural Body Care Products, With a Side of Activism

By JANE L. LEVERE

With sales of organic and natural beauty and personal products on the rise, companies are courting customers who lead a “holistic lifestyle.”

For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology
Slack Technologies' offices in San Francisco. The company's messaging system has been successful with small businesses, and it is working to attract more large corporate clients.

Slack, an Upstart in Messaging, Now Faces Giant Tech Rivals

By KATIE BENNER

Microsoft and Facebook have rolled out competing tools. But Slack’s chief executive says small tech companies with new ideas have a history of defeating the big guys.

In the past, hotel executives played down Airbnb's impact on their industry, but documents reveal a

Inside the Hotel Industry’s Plan to Combat Airbnb

By KATIE BENNER

Newly obtained documents show how the American Hotel and Lodging Association is taking steps to curb the online short-term rental company.

For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports
The Y.M.C.A. in Paris says its basketball court, with its herringbone pattern and loose slats, is the oldest one in the world. It has been continuously functional since the building opened in 1893.

A Court Used for Playing Hoops Since 1893. Where? Paris.

By ANDREW KEH

A Y.M.C.A. in France claims the oldest basketball court in the world. But it is in no shape for regular basketball games.

Sparky Lyle won two World Series championships with the Yankees.

Sparky Lyle in Monument Park? Fans Say Yes, but He Disagrees

By FILIP BONDY

Lyle insists he doesn’t belong with those honored at Yankee Stadium. But on the 40th anniversary of his Cy Young season, and a Yankees title, many say he does.

Alexander Radulov scored the Canadiens' final goal against Henrik Lundqvist in Montreal's 3-1 first-round playoff win on Sunday.

Canadiens 3, Rangers 1 | Canadiens lead series, 2-1

Further Futility at Home Dooms Rangers Against Montreal

By ALLAN KREDA

The Rangers trail in the first-round series, 2-1, and even drew boos from the Madison Square Garden crowd when they bumbled through a third-period power play.

For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts
Kendrick Lamar at the Music Hall of Williamsburg in December.

Review: Kendrick Lamar’s Anxiety Leads to Joy and Jabs on New Album

By JON CARAMANICA

The rapper reflects on interior concerns on his “tart and punchy” fourth studio album, “DAMN.”

Lena Dunham in the series finale of

Review: ‘Girls’ Finale Walks Into the Future, Pantless and Unbowed

By JAMES PONIEWOZIK

This series wraps up with Lena Dunham’s Hannah feeding her infant, but the episode is about so much more than that.

A pilot and her portrayer: Beverley Bass and Jenn Colella after an October 2016 concert performance of

A Pioneering Pilot, a Broadway Show and a Life-Changing Bond

By MICHAEL PAULSON

“Come From Away” has brought together an actress and the real-life pilot who broke barriers and whose flight was diverted to Newfoundland on 9/11.

For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

New York
Officers Efrain Morales, left, and Joshua Jones with body cameras in 2014. Police labor unions and civil liberties lawyers plan to challenge a New York pilot program.

Civil Rights Lawyers Plan to Challenge New York’s Body-Camera Program

By ASHLEY SOUTHALL

Police unions also have objections to the guidelines for the pilot program, which was to begin this month but continues to face roadblocks.

Nicholas Lucivero, who fought in the Battle of the Bulge, was killed in 1957 when a train hit his milk truck in Queens. The story became a childhood obsession for Mr. Walowitz.

Ode to a Milkman, Killed 60 Years Ago, Soothes His Family

By COREY KILGANNON

A man haunted since boyhood by a fatal accident in Queens wrote a poem that found its way to, and touched, a victim’s family.

Part of Martina Mrongovius's use of old slides from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in an exhibition at the Materials for the Arts gallery in Long Island City, Queens.

Grace Notes

Donated Slides From the Met Get a Second Life, and Showing

By JAMES BARRON

The Metropolitan Museum of Art had thousands of 35-millimeter slides it no longer needed. Material for the Arts knew just what to do with them.

For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Media & Advertising
Roman Badanin of TV Rain in Moscow. He was one of three editors at the independent media company RBC who had to leave after its flagship newspaper reported on sensitive financial arrangements of members of President Vladimir V. Putin's family.

Mediator

In Putin’s Moscow, a Pliant Press That Trump So Craves

By JIM RUTENBERG

Watching Russian television and hearing journalists’ war stories, I wondered if I had arrived through an alt-right wormhole.

Shannon Donnelly, a columnist at The Palm Beach Daily News, and Donald J. Trump in 2006 at his Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida.

The Society Columnist With a Front-Row Seat at Mar-a-Lago

By KATIE ROGERS

Shannon Donnelly, a journalist who has chronicled Palm Beach society for decades, has been a fly on the gilded wall during several of President Trump’s visits since he took office.

For more media and advertising news, go to NYTimes.com/Media »

Obituaries
Bruce Langhorne, far left, in an image from a YouTube video with Carolyn Hester, Bob Dylan and Bill Lee in 1961 in a studio in New York.

Bruce Langhorne, Guitarist Who Inspired ‘Mr. Tambourine Man,’ Dies at 78

By BILL FRISKICS-WARREN

Mr. Langhorne played on many influential folk-rock albums, most notably Bob Dylan’s landmark “Bringing It All Back Home.”

Navy Coach Wayne Hardin with quarterback Roger Staubach during the 1964 Cotton Bowl.

Wayne Hardin, Hall of Fame Football Coach at Navy, Dies at 91

By DANIEL E. SLOTNIK

Hardin led the Midshipmen to five straight victories over Army and later helped Temple to its first bowl-game win. He joined the College Football Hall of Fame in 2013.

Joseph Rascoff in an undated photograph. A serendipitous encounter with the financial adviser for the Rolling Stones led to his being the band's business manager and tour producer.

Joseph Rascoff, Who Had Rolling Stones’ Tours Under His Thumb, Dies at 71

By RICHARD SANDOMIR

He preferred classical music, but Mr. Rascoff became a business manager and tour producer for powerhouse rock ‘n’ roll acts including U2 and Paul Simon.

For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

Editorial
President Trump spoke to reporters about North Korea at the White House on Thursday.

Editorial

President Trump’s Loose Talk on North Korea

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

He must avoid overconfidence and bombast in dealing with the North, which adds to the fears driving its nuclear program.

Editorial

The L.G.B.T. Trump Fallacy

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

The president was hailed by some as a transformational Republican on gay rights. That was wishful thinking.

Coal miners waiting for Scott Pruitt to arrive for a press event in Sycamore, Pa.

Editorial

Wrong Message, Wrong Coal Mine

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

The E.P.A. chief’s rallying cry for the coal industry was misplaced at a company looking to get out of the business.

For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Op-Ed

Op-Ed | Aatish Taseer

Anatomy of a Lynching

By AATISH TASEER

A mentality of mob violence has overtaken India.

Op-Ed Columnist

Donald Trump, the Worst of America

By CHARLES M. BLOW

He is the logical extension of misogyny, racism, privilege and anti-intellectualism.

Pedestrians walking past Rego Center, in Queens. The Sears store there closed recently.

Op-Ed Columnist

Why Don’t All Jobs Matter?

By PAUL KRUGMAN

Economic pain, beyond coal and manufacturing.

For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

ON THIS DAY

On April 17, 1961, about 1,500 C.I.A.-trained Cuban exiles launched the disastrous Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba in a failed attempt to overthrow the government of Fidel Castro.

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