Today’s Headlines: With Trump Appointees, a Raft of Potential Conflicts and ‘No Transparency’

Federal Judge Blocks Arkansas Executions |
View in Browser | Add nytdirect@nytimes.com to your address book. | Unsubscribe
Top News
D. J. Gribbin, an infrastructure specialist on the White House's National Economic Council, with President Trump this month. Mr. Gribbin used to work for Macquarie, a bank that specializes in infrastructure and stands to gain from such undertakings.

With Trump Appointees, a Raft of Potential Conflicts and ‘No Transparency’

By ERIC LIPTON, BEN PROTESS and ANDREW W. LEHREN

President Trump is populating the federal government with former lobbyists who in many cases are influencing policy in industries where they were recently paid.

Demonstrators protested the death penalty in front of the Arkansas State Capitol in Little Rock on Friday.

Federal Judge Blocks Arkansas Executions

By ALAN BLINDER

A federal judge halted Arkansas’ plans for an extraordinary series of executions set to begin on Monday. A state judge’s ruling had already put the schedule in doubt.

René Álvarez and his daughters, from left, Sabina, 12, Ximena, 14, and Yetla, 17, at home on the outskirts in Mexico City.

Mexican Deportees, Once Ignored Back Home, Now Find ‘Open Arms’

By ELISABETH MALKIN

The number of Mexicans kicked out of the United States actually fell at the start of President Trump’s term, but politicians and others in Mexico have seized on the issue.

For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

Get the Morning Briefing in Your Inbox What you need to know to start your day, delivered Monday through Friday.
Sign up »

ADVERTISEMENT

Editors’ Picks
Destroyed buildings in Homs in 2014. More than 400,000 people have been killed in the Syrian war.

WORLD

As Atrocities Mount in Syria, Justice Seems Out of Reach

By ANNE BARNARD, BEN HUBBARD and IAN FISHER

A mountain of evidence has been compiled against Syrian officials for war crimes from torture to summary killings. But there is no clear path to justice.

OPINION | Opinion

Why You Should Read Books You Hate

By PAMELA PAUL

Defensiveness makes you a better, more skeptical reader – a critic.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

“They cannot grieve, they cannot remarry, they cannot sell property, the family has lost their breadwinner.” FADWA MAHMOUD, the wife of a Syrian dissident who disappeared in 2012, describing the plight of Syrian women whose loved ones are among the 100,000 detained or missing.

World
North Korea's first submarine-launched ballistic missile, the Pukguksong-1, was among the hardware displayed Saturday in the capital, Pyongyang.

North Korean Missile Launch Fails, and a Show of Strength Fizzles

By CHOE SANG-HUN, DAVID E. SANGER and WILLIAM J. BROAD

The timing was an embarrassment for Kim Jong-un, because the launch appeared to have been intended to coincide with the approach of a fleet of American warships.

The funeral for those killed in the Palm Sunday suicide bombing at St. Mark's Cathedral in Alexandria, Egypt.

After Church Bombings, Egyptian Christians Are Resigned but Resolute

By DECLAN WALSH

Attacks on two churches that killed 45 people remind Copts of a 2011 bombing that has never been solved.

Referendum Inflames Concerns Over Turkey’s Grip in Germany

By ALISON SMALE

German officials believe that President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, whose power could be expanded by a vote on Sunday, is using a decades-old arrangement between the countries to spy on opponents.

For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

ADVERTISEMENT

U.S.
An installer putting in a drip irrigation line at Harborside Farms, a large marijuana grower in California's Salinas Valley.

Marijuana Goes Industrial in California

By THOMAS FULLER

Growers are moving to large farms in the Salinas Valley, threatening the state’s smaller cannabis farmers and inspiring fears of a glut.

The Gallatin Fossil Plant, a coal-burning power plant run by the Tennessee Valley Authority in Gallatin, Tenn. Coal ash from the plant has been seeping into groundwater and the river, two recent lawsuits say, possibly threatening drinking water for a million people.

2 Tennessee Cases Bring Coal’s Hidden Hazard to Light

By TATIANA SCHLOSSBERG

Coal ash, a largely unseen byproduct of electricity production, is leaking from storage ponds, two lawsuits contend, and could be threatening the drinking water of more than a million people.

April and her baby in a pen at the Animal Adventure Park in Harpursville, N.Y.

April the Giraffe, an Internet Star, Gives Birth. Finally.

By ELI ROSENBERG

The giraffe you’ve been waiting for made its long-awaited debut on a live stream that has, over the past few months, drawn millions of viewers.

For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

ADVERTISEMENT

Politics
Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump in the Rose Garden of the White House this month.

Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump: Pillars of Family-Driven West Wing

By PETER BAKER, GLENN THRUSH and MAGGIE HABERMAN

As the president has soured on Stephen K. Bannon, Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump have emerged as President Trump’s most important advisers, at least for now.

Demonstrators during a rally on Saturday near the Mar-a-Lago resort in Palm Beach, Fla. They were demanding that President Trump release his tax returns.

As Tax Day Approaches, Protesters Demand to See Trump’s Returns

By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and EMILY BAUMGAERTNER

Hundreds marched near Mar-a-Lago in Florida, and thousands gathered in Washington and other cities across the country.

Under the new House bill, the Congressional Budget Office said, doctors would slightly decrease the use of diagnostic tests, like X-rays, and other services that they perform to reduce their exposure to lawsuits.

G.O.P. Bill Would Make Medical Malpractice Suits Harder to Win

By ROBERT PEAR

Supporters say the plan would limit “frivolous lawsuits” and cut health costs; critics say it would take rights away from patients served by federal programs.

For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business
Hilda Awuor lost her job at the Saks Fifth Avenue store in Lower Manhattan last month. She has decided to look for a new career.

Is American Retail at a Historic Tipping Point?

By MICHAEL CORKERY

The profound reordering of New York’s shopping scene reflects a broad restructuring in the American retail industry.

A street in Bangalore, India, as seen by an Uber driver. Uber is pouring money, engineers and logistical expertise into what could be the world's largest market for transportation services.

Uber Wants to Rule the World. First It Must Conquer India.

By FARHAD MANJOO

Uber is diving headlong into India, where it must face the sobering realities of analog life in a rapidly developing country.

The market dynamics that allow a generic drug manufacturer to hike up prices have to do mostly with competition. The problem, pharmaceutical experts say, definitely needs fixing.

Fair Game

Defiant, Generic Drug Maker Continues to Raise Prices

By GRETCHEN MORGENSON

Despite scrutiny from federal and state investigators, shares of Lannett Company are up 15 percent this year to date.

For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Sports

Interactive Feature Interactive Feature: Why Base Stealers Target Noah Syndergaard

By BEDEL SAGET and JOE WARD

Noah Syndergaard gave up more stolen bases than any other pitcher last season. Here is why.

The Cardinals' Yadier Molina, left, and Adam Wainwright earlier this month. They have 219 regular-season starts together. The last combo with more? Mike Scioscia and Fernando Valenzuela.

A Baseball Battery That Hasn’t Lost Its Charge

By TYLER KEPNER

No current combination of catcher and starting pitcher has lasted longer than the Cardinals’ Yadier Molina and Adam Wainwright.

Capt. Bill Curtis died at age 91 on Oct. 24; in January, his ashes were stolen from a parked pickup truck in the Coconut Grove neighborhood of Miami.

The One That Got Away: Theft of Fishing Guide’s Ashes Becomes a Whodunit

By JOHN CLARKE

It was the last time anyone saw what’s left of Capt. Bill Curtis, who changed saltwater fly-fishing and inspired characters in books.

For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts
From left, Rose Byrne as Rebecca Skloot and Oprah Winfrey as Deborah Lacks in

Oprah Winfrey on the ‘The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks’

By SALAMISHAH TILLET

Ms. Winfrey, the star of the HBO film adaptation, talks about the book’s resonance and her reluctant decision to be in the movie.

Janis Joplin performed with Big Brother and the Holding Company at Monterey Pop. After the festival, she was swiftly signed by Clive Davis.

Monterey Pop, the Rock Festival That Sparked It All, Returns

By BEN SISARIO

The California event that defined the spirit of the Summer of Love, and gave Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin a boost, will rise again in June at 50.

A golden ticket: Jake Ryan Flynn as Charlie Bucket in

A Second Bite of the Wonka Bar: Reimagining ‘Charlie’ for Broadway

By MICHAEL PAULSON

The New York musical version of “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” required a new director, a new cast, a partial rewrite and old favorite songs.

For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

Metropolitan
The Split Rock Sweetwater Prayer Camp along the Ramapo River in New Jersey, where the Ramapough Lenape Nation has been staging a protest against a proposed oil pipeline.

The Ramapoughs vs. the World

By NOAH REMNICK

Will an oil pipeline proposed for tribal lands destroy the Ramapough Lenape Nation along the New Jersey-New York border? Or will it be the catalyst that once again unites the tribe?

David First, in his Brooklyn apartment, led the noise-rock band the Notekillers, who played the New York music scene in the late 1970s and early '80s.

Revival for the Notekillers, Still Noisy After All These Years

By SARAH GRANT

The unsung noise-rock band and its leader, David First, are somewhat closer to having a moment. Finally.

Cathy Hawkins is an owner of the last Liberty House store, in Manhattan, which will shut down on April 27.

Liberty House and the Shifting Focus of Political Style

By GINIA BELLAFANTE

The closing of a store that made social justice the fabric of its business offers lessons about fashion and the meaning of resistance.

For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Fashion & Style
Glenn O'Brien on the set of

Glenn O’Brien’s Friends Remember a ‘Successful Maniac’

By JOHN ORTVED

Mr. O’Brien, a man for all New York seasons, in the arts, fashion, music and media, died last week at age 70.

Maureen Chiquet, the former global chief executive of Chanel, has a book deal and a new career path.

Maureen Chiquet’s Move From Chanel to Self-Empowerment

By VANESSA FRIEDMAN

Fired from her job with the French fashion brand, Ms. Chiquet emerged with a new career plan and a new relationship.

Modern Love

A Dose of Empathy From My Syrian Doctor

By RANDI DAVENPORT

A woman with a debilitating motor neuron disease finds hope in a man from a war-ravaged country.

For more fashion news, go to NYTimes.com/Fashion »

Travel
Chéri is on a handsome stretch of Malcolm X Boulevard, between West 121st and West 122nd Street. The owner operated a restaurant in Paris for 20 years before moving to New York.

Harlem’s French Renaissance

By JOEL DREYFUSS

A small Francophile community, lured by Harlem’s sense of community and storied history, has sprung up, and along with it have come French restaurants.

Bar, Ktery Neexistuje, or the Bar Which Doesn't Exist, is on a narrow street northeast of the main square in Brno. Rare bottles fill shelves that reach to the ceiling.

Pursuits

In Brno, Drinks for Morning, Noon and Night

By EVAN RAIL

A whirlwind tour of the drinks scene in the Czech Republic’s second city.

36 Hours

36 Hours in Baltimore

By NELL McSHANE WULFHART

Charm City has raised the charm quotient, with hip cocktail bars, coffeehouses and a quirky historic appeal.

For more travel news, go to NYTimes.com/Travel »

Magazine

Feature

The Return of Lorde

By JONAH WEINER

Four years after her debut album, the pop prodigy is back with a testimonial to heartbreak and solitude.

Mike Judge.

Feature

Mike Judge, the Bard of Suck

By WILLY STALEY

From “Idiocracy” to “Silicon Valley,” the writer and director has established himself as America’s foremost chronicler of its own self-destructive tendencies.

A poster of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in Istanbul.

Feature

Inside Turkey’s Purge

By SUZY HANSEN

As the ruling party expands the ranks of its enemies, life in a fragile democracy becomes stranger and stranger.

For more from the Sunday magazine, go to NYTimes.com/Magazine »

Obituaries
Al Golin in 2011. His cold call to Ray Kroc to win a modest public relations contract began a relationship that helped McDonald's sell billions of burgers.

Al Golin, PR Man Whose Vision Helped Make McDonald’s a Success, Dies at 87

By SAM ROBERTS

Mr. Golin was a young press agent when he made a cold call to Ray Kroc in 1957 that began a 60-year relationship and helped turn the fast-food restaurant with the golden arches into a household word.

Dr. Mark Wainberg, at an International AIDS Society conference in Toronto in 2006, said the absence from the event of the Canadian prime minister, Stephen Harper, would put him

Dr. Mark Wainberg, Who Identified a Key AIDS Drug, Dies at 71

By RICHARD SANDOMIR

As a microbiologist, he found that the drug Lamivudine was effective against H.I.V., and he later became a global champion of AIDS treatment and awareness.

For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

Editorial

Editorial

Mr. Trump’s 10-Second Convictions

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

There’s one clear pattern in his history of making promises: betrayal.

Jeff Sessions speaking at the White House last month.

Editorial

Canada, but Not Jeff Sessions, Moves Boldly on Marijuana

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau wants to legalize the drug. Attorney General Jeff Sessions feels differently.

For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Op-Ed
Jimmy Carter delivering a Sunday school lecture in 2000 at Maranatha Baptist Church in Plains, Ga., where he continues to teach.

Op-Ed Columnist

President Carter, Am I a Christian?

By NICHOLAS KRISTOF

I asked the longtime Sunday School teacher if we really need to believe that Jesus rose from the dead.

Franklin Roosevelt and Fala, his Scottish terrier.

Opinion

What Kind of Pet Should Donald Trump Get?

By ALEX BEAM

Practically every president has kept animals in the Executive Mansion. Its current occupant would be wise to do the same.

Op-Ed Contributor

America’s Uncivil War Over Words

By KORY STAMPER

The long and bloody history of fighting over dictionary definitions.

For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Sunday Review

Op-Ed Columnist

Steve Bannon Was Doomed

By FRANK BRUNI

Woe to the Washington aide unschooled in self-effacement.

The Cathedral of Saint John the Divine in New York City.

Op-Ed Columnist

Save the Mainline

By ROSS DOUTHAT

Why America needs its ex-Protestants to go back to church.

ON THIS DAY

On April 16, 1947, America’s worst harbor explosion occurred in Texas City, Texas, when the French ship Grandcamp, carrying ammonium nitrate fertilizer, caught fire and blew up, devastating the town. Another ship, the Highflyer, exploded the following day. The explosions and resulting fires killed more than 500 people and left 200 others missing.

(function(win,doc){ var scriptElement, scrSrc; if (typeof (win.ClickTaleCreateDOMElement) != “function”) { win.ClickTaleCreateDOMElement = function(tagName) { if (doc.createElementNS) { return doc.createElementNS(‘http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml’, tagName); } return doc.createElement(tagName); } } win.WRInitTime=(new Date()).getTime(); scriptElement = ClickTaleCreateDOMElement(‘script’); scriptElement.type = “text/javascript”; scrSrc = doc.location.protocol==’https:’? ‘https://cdnssl.clicktale.net/’: ‘http://cdn.clicktale.net/’; scrSrc += ‘www06/ptc/6225d2f7-ef1f-40c1-8ba1-9f0fcfce81eb.js’; scriptElement.src = scrSrc; doc.getElementsByTagName(‘body’)[0].appendChild(scriptElement); })(window,document);

This entry was posted in Uncategorized by news. Bookmark the permalink.