Today’s Headlines: U.S. Takes Sharper Tone on Russia’s Role in Syria

After Campaign Exit, Manafort Borrowed From Businesses With Trump Ties |
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Top News
President Trump met with Jens Stoltenberg, the NATO secretary general, in the Oval Office on Wednesday.

U.S. Takes Sharper Tone on Russia’s Role in Syria

By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and DAVID E. SANGER

President Trump’s hopes for an alliance faded as he and his administration publicly chastised President Vladimir V. Putin.

Paul Manafort's transactions raise a number of questions, including whether his decision to turn to lenders connected to Donald J. Trump was related to his role in the campaign.

After Campaign Exit, Manafort Borrowed From Businesses With Trump Ties

By MIKE McINTIRE

A shell company created by Paul Manafort the same day he left the presidential campaign quickly received $13 million in loans from the businesses.

A sign in Istanbul asks for yes votes on Sunday in a referendum that would expand the powers of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey, who is pictured on the sign.

Turkey in Turmoil and Chaos Since Purge Aimed at Dissenters

By PATRICK KINGSLEY

The government has fired or suspended about 130,000 people suspected of being dissidents from the public and private sectors since a coup attempt last summer.

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Editors’ Picks
Lula, a bear from the zoo in Mosul, after arriving at an animal rehabilitation shelter in Jordan.

WORLD

Lula and Simba, Last Surviving Animals at Mosul Zoo, Have Been Rescued

By RANA F. SWEIS

Lula, a bear, and Simba, a lion, were taken to a wildlife shelter in Jordan after being saved from their home, which was severely damaged in battles for control of the city.

OPINION | Op-Ed | Arthur C. Brooks

Can the G.O.P. Turn Back the Tide of Town Hall Anger?

By ARTHUR C. BROOKS

Members of Congress facing furious crowds could learn a lesson from social science and start treating protesters as individuals.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

“The world’s two foremost nuclear powers cannot have this kind of relationship.” REX W. TILLERSON, the United States secretary of state, after meeting with President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia in Moscow.

Today’s Videos

Video Video: Video Shows Sacramento Officer Beating Pedestrian A video of a Sacramento police officer’s violent encounter with a man who was allegedly jaywalking has prompted a criminal investigation.

A magnetic therapy area at Hundred Devils' Cave.

Video Video: Is This China’s Fountain of Youth? With the number of older people on the rise in China, longevity-themed tourism is blossoming. Take a 360 tour of Bama County, where visitors breathe in the air that is said to have healing powers.

Secretary of State Rex W. Tillerson with his Russian counterpart Sergey V. Lavrov in Moscow on Wednesday.

Video Video: Tillerson: ‘Low Level of Trust’ Between U.S. and Russia Secretary of State Rex W. Tillerson met with President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia for two hours and discussed a range of issues on Wednesday.

World
The United Nations Security Council voting on a draft resolution on Syria on Wednesday. The resolution won 10 votes, but Russia vetoed it, the eighth time the country has used its veto power to back the Syrian government.

Russia Vetoes U.N. Resolution Condemning Syria Chemical Attack

By SOMINI SENGUPTA

The resolution would have strengthened the ability of investigators to look into the attack that killed dozens of civilians. The United States blames Syria’s president.

Flight operations on the United States aircraft carrier Carl Vinson last week. The Carl Vinson and other warships are heading toward the Korean Peninsula in an effort to deter the North from testing a nuclear weapon or launching missiles.

Xi and Trump Discuss Rising Tensions With North Korea

By JANE PERLEZ

A prominent Chinese state-run newspaper warned the North that it faced a cutoff of vital oil supplies if it dared test a nuclear weapon.

Dome-shaped pingos, mounds consisting of a layer of soil over a core of ice, in the permafrost in the Northwest Territories, Canada.

More Permafrost Than Thought May Be Lost as Planet Warms

By HENRY FOUNTAIN

A study suggests that as the planet warms toward 2 degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels, each degree Celsius of warming will lead to the thawing of 1.5 million square miles of permafrost.

For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

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U.S.
A page from

James Baldwin’s Archive, Long Hidden, Comes (Mostly) Into View

By JENNIFER SCHUESSLER

The Schomburg Center in Harlem has bought this author’s rich archive. But the private letters admirers have longed to read will largely remain under seal.

The Trump administration is moving to speed up the hiring of border agents, even as lawmakers are balking at paying for a wall.

To Detain More Immigrants, Trump Administration to Speed Border Hiring

By VIVIAN YEE and RON NIXON

The internal memo also says the administration wants to find space to detain thousands more immigrants and to speed deportation cases.

Traffic in New York City. Conservative groups want Scott Pruitt, the head of the Environmental Protection Agency, to overturn a ruling known as the endangerment finding, which provides the legal foundation for the Obama administration's climate-change policies.

Scott Pruitt Faces Anger From Right Over E.P.A. Finding He Won’t Fight

By CORAL DAVENPORT

Critics charge the agency’s administrator should have challenged a legal finding that underpinned the Obama climate policies, but he refuses to budge.

For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

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Politics
Judson Hill, a Republican candidate in Georgia's Sixth Congressional District, made calls at his campaign headquarters in Sandy Springs, an Atlanta suburb, on Tuesday.

Suburban G.O.P. Voters Sour on Party, Raising Republican Fears for 2018

By ALEXANDER BURNS and JONATHAN MARTIN

A narrower-than-expected victory in Kansas and an even tougher contest next week in Georgia are highlighting Republicans’ troubles with affluent white voters.

Stephen K. Bannon, President Trump's chief strategist, during a meeting with President Xi Jinping of China at Mar-a-Lago in Florida last week.

Trump Undercuts Bannon, Whose Job May Be in Danger

By JEREMY W. PETERS and MAGGIE HABERMAN

President Trump said Mr. Bannon was not the chief strategist of his campaign victory, distancing himself from the contentious hard-right adviser who is increasingly isolated in the White House.

Carter Page, a former Trump campaign adviser, during an appearance in Moscow in December.

Court Approved Wiretap on Trump Campaign Aide Over Russia Ties

By MATTHEW ROSENBERG and MATT APUZZO

To get permission to wiretap Carter Page, an adviser to the Trump campaign, last summer, the Justice Department had to show probable cause that he was acting as a Russian agent.

For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business
President Trump said he no longer wanted to label China a currency manipulator.

Trump Reversals Hint at Wall Street Wing’s Sway in White House

By ALAN RAPPEPORT

Startling shifts on China and the Export-Import Bank and the possible reappointment of the chairwoman of the Federal Reserve show financiers may be gaining the upper hand over the populists.

Demonstrators in Manhattan on Wednesday called for Fox News to dismiss Bill O'Reilly.

The Murdochs Assess the O’Reilly Damage

By EMILY STEEL and MICHAEL S. SCHMIDT

Bill O’Reilly has left Fox News for a vacation while his employers decide whether they should force him from the network over sexual harassment accusations.

Sean Spicer, the White House press secretary, said of his comments favorably comparing Hitler to President Bashar al-Assad of Syria:

Why ‘Sorry’ Is Still the Hardest Word

By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM

The representatives of United Airlines and the White House both found themselves grappling with the increasingly common ritual: the public apology.

For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology
United Airlines planes at San Francisco International Airport. Oscar Munoz, United's chief executive, offered an apology and pledged to review the airline's policies two days after a passenger was violently ejected from an overbooked flight.

State of the Art

How Technology Has Failed to Improve Your Airline Experience

By FARHAD MANJOO

Silicon Valley prides itself on its capacity to upend entrenched industries. But airlines have eluded tech disruption.

. United Grapples With PR Crisis Over Videos of Man Being Dragged Off Plane

Burger King ‘O.K. Google’ Ad Doesn’t Seem O.K. With Google

By SAPNA MAHESHWARI

The commercial was a novel but potentially invasive marketing tactic that came as more Americans use voice-activated devices.

Ford's latest Lincoln Navigator is larger and more powerful than its predecessor, while aiming squarely at car owners seeking luxury features.

Bigger, Faster, More Lavish: Americans Crave S.U.V.s, and Carmakers Oblige

By BILL VLASIC

At the New York International Auto Show, powerful sport-utility vehicles are at center stage, a sign of the continuing shift away from traditional passenger cars.

For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports

Is Russell Westbrook’s Season the Best Ever? Some Apples and Oranges to Pick From

By THE NEW YORK TIMES

Westbrook’s rather outrageous regular season must be considered the single greatest season by any athlete ever, right? No? Here are some other contenders.

Edwin Encarnacion of the Indians being introduced before Cleveland's home opener against the Chicago White Sox on Tuesday. The Chief Wahoo logo could not be seen anywhere on the stadium building or on the field, but it was on the players' jerseys and caps.

Commissioner Starts to Press Cleveland Indians About Logo

By DAVID WALDSTEIN

In a statement, Rob Manfred was said to have expressed a desire “to transition away from the Chief Wahoo logo,” a smiling caricature the team uses that many find offensive.

Washington Capitals center Jay Beagle stealing the puck from the Calgary Flames' Johnny Gaudreau in a game last month in Washington.

Capitals See Players Behind the Stars as Keys to Playoff Success

By TOM WORGO

Goals contributed by players like Jay Beagle, a fourth-line center, will make the difference. That’s the hope, anyway.

For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts
The Exil Ensemble, at the Gorki Theater in Berlin, has opened a new play based on the actors' lives. From left, Karim Daoud, Hussein Al Shatheli, Maryam Abu Khaled, Ayham Majid Agha, Kenda Hmeidan and Mazen Aljubbeh.

Turning Traumatic Arrivals Into Art: Exiles Form a Theater Troupe

By RACHEL DONADIO

Young actors from war-torn nations have created Exil Ensemble at the Gorki Theater in Berlin. Now they are starring in a play based on their lives.

Marge Hendrick, center; Jamiel Laurence, left; and other members of Scottish Ballet in

Review: Scottish Ballet Finds the Poetry in … Poetry

By ALASTAIR MACAULAY

The company’s debut season in New York, at the Joyce Theater, includes an unusual dance – to Dylan Thomas poems read by the actor Richard Burton.

Robert Ryman in his studio, New York, 1998. He has explored the subtleties of white and of the square for decades.

Robert Ryman, Minimalist Master, Donates Trove to Dia Art Foundation

By RANDY KENNEDY

The painter Robert Ryman is giving 21 of his works, a mini-survey of his career, to Dia. The paintings will remain in rooms of their own, as arranged by the artist.

For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

New York
Judge Sheila Abdus-Salaam at the Court of Appeals in Albany last year.

Sheila Abdus-Salaam, Judge on New York’s Top Court, Is Found Dead in Hudson River

By MATTHEW HAAG and WILLIAM K. RASHBAUM

Judge Abdus-Salaam, who joined the State Court of Appeals in 2013, was pulled from the river by the police on Wednesday afternoon.

Hillary Clinton praised Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo's tuition initiative on Wednesday during an event at LaGuardia Community College in Queens.

Cuomo Adopts a Middle-Class Mantra

By JESSE McKINLEY

Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York has been supplementing his liberal political portfolio with ideas that have broader appeal such as his so-called free-tuition plan.

Arturo Di Modica, the sculptor who created

Wounded by ‘Fearless Girl,’ Creator of ‘Charging Bull’ Wants Her to Move

By JAMES BARRON

The sculptor Arturo Di Modica said Wall Street’s bronze girl, meant to symbolize female empowerment, distorts the meaning of his work.

For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Fashion & Style
Jeff Koons, who is collaborating with Louis Vuitton, in his studio on West 29th Street in Manhattan.

Jeff Koons’s New Line

By VANESSA FRIEDMAN

The artist’s latest project: a metaphysical meditation on the eternal in the form of bags. His collaborator is Louis Vuitton.

John Dean, left, and Salman Rushdie at the Library Hotel during a cocktail event hosted by the Ethics Center of Australia.

Encounters

John Dean, Who Worked for Nixon, Sizes Up Trump

By LAURA M. HOLSON

Mr. Dean, an expert on the abuses of presidential power, pays a visit to the Trump Grill.

Hillary Clinton and Katy Perry during a campaign-related concert in Philadelphia in November.

On the Runway

Hillary Clinton, Shoe Model?

By VANESSA FRIEDMAN

The former presidential candidate steps out in Katy Perry’s collection, and now the resistance knows what to wear on its feet.

For more fashion news, go to NYTimes.com/Fashion »

Obituaries
Dorothy Mengering and her son, David Letterman, at his alma mater, Ball State University, for the dedication of the David Letterman Communication and Media Building, in 2007.

Dorothy Mengering, David Letterman’s Mother and Comic Foil, Dies at 95

By DANIEL E. SLOTNIK

A white-haired avatar of small-town values who became a beloved regular on her son’s shows, she showed off her pies and interviewed Hillary Clinton.

Frederick B. Lacey, United States attorney in New Jersey, talking to reporters outside Federal Court in Newark about numbers racket arrests in 1969.

Frederick B. Lacey, Who Prosecuted Corruption in New Jersey, Dies at 96

By SAM ROBERTS

Mr. Lacey won convictions against mayors, other public officials and Mafia members before becoming a judge whose cases included the French Connection trial.